Articles about Social and Emotional Learning (SEL), Mindfulness in the Classroom and Trauma Informed Teaching

Supporting Parents during COVID-19

Supporting Parents during COVID-19

During this unprecedented time of uncertainty and unpredictability, we offer a therapeutic lens and resources for families struggling with this transition of having their children home full-time. 

5 Activities for Kids During Social Distancing

5 Activities for Kids During Social Distancing

As more experts recommend social distancing, parents wonder what to do with kids who are cooped up at home. We understand that COVID-19 is no snow day, but children need a break from the gloom of quarantine. Without losing sight of how serious the Coronavirus pandemic...

Talking to Kids about the Coronavirus: 4 Tips

Talking to Kids about the Coronavirus: 4 Tips

As coronavirus continues to affect each of us, we would like to provide resources and tips in response to student questions regarding the virus and school closures, in addition to providing activities that students can do at home to stay engaged.

Inclusive Mindfulness (Part 2)

Inclusive Mindfulness (Part 2)

How can you make mindfulness accessible to kids? Use multimodal learning to engage all five senses and empower students to be co-creators in the experience.

Inclusive Mindfulness (Part 1)

Inclusive Mindfulness (Part 1)

One question we get often is along the lines of “will mindfulness really  work for my students?” While every student, classroom, and school is different, there is ample research showing the benefits of mindfulness on youth and adults alike.  Like any classroom intervention, there are ways to differentiate and make accommodations to meet the needs of different students. With this blog series, we’ll provide teachers with tips on making mindfulness an inclusive practice in your classroom. 

Student New Year’s Resolutions in the Classroom

Student New Year’s Resolutions in the Classroom

According to recent research, a student’s ability to set and achieve goals is linked to higher grades, lower college-dropout rates and greater well-being in adulthood. Goal setting is also a large component of self-management, considered critical to a student’s academic and social success. So how do we set effective goals? As it turns out, there is a science to goal setting that reveals some pretty useful strategies for achieving goals. Follow these tips to set new year goals in your classroom.

Five Tips to Reduce Winter Break Anxiety for Students

Five Tips to Reduce Winter Break Anxiety for Students

While the upcoming break may be a much-needed break for teachers, they know that the time leading up to holidays and school breaks can create periods of stress and chaos in the classroom. Many students enjoy the structure and safety they find in the classroom and the holidays cause an interruption to the predictable routine of the school day. This month, we reached out to a handful of educators for their insights and together we created five tips to reduce stress and anxiety for students during this time of year.

SEL Book Review: Small Things by Mel Tregonning

SEL Book Review: Small Things by Mel Tregonning

In the no-words graphic novel, Small Things, Tregonning tells the story of a boy realizing he is not alone struggling with his adolescent feelings. The boy learns the importance of naming his feelings and like so many social and emotional learning ideas is a skill that speaks to adults as much as children.  

Classroom Gratitude Challenge

Classroom Gratitude Challenge

With Thanksgiving coming up, it’s a good time to practice some gratitude. Research on gratitude has shown that regular practicing gratitude (thinking about what you’re grateful for) enjoy lots of benefits, including having better physical health! Here are two weeks of daily gratitude questions you can pose to your class leading up to Thanksgiving break.

SEL at Parent-Teacher Conferences

SEL at Parent-Teacher Conferences

While kids may worry about what is said at parent-teacher conferences, those conversations can be just as stressful for teachers. Parents may feel defensive or upset when they hear that their child is not excelling academically — but it can be even more difficult when teachers have to relay that there are problems of a social-emotional nature. This month we offer teachers SEL resources for parent-teacher conferences.