How The Brain Grows

GRADES 3-5

Learning Goal

 Students will understand the basics of how the brain changes and grows
(i.e., neuroplasticity).

Learning Objectives

By the end of the lessons, students will be able to:

  • Understand what neuroplasticity is
  • Experience and reflect on the process of creating a new neural pathway through a memory game

Learning Summary

Our brains create new neural pathways throughout our entire lives—this is called neuroplasticity. These pathways allow us to access thoughts, skills, feelings, and memories. We have billions of neurons that connect to one another to make these learning pathways. The more a skill is practiced, the stronger that connection.
When you stop practicing, your brain decides it is no longer important and it lets those connections weaken.

In this lesson, students start with a mindful moment in which they use the acronym STOP to focus: Standing/Sitting tall and breathing; Tuning into their body; Observing their surroundings; and thinking of Possibilities. You then lead a discussion on neuroplasticity: that with practice, the brain can grow and change. Then, through a memory game in which they repeatedly draw connections between items, students experience how neural pathways work and how they are strengthened through repetition. The discussion that follows asks students to reflect on how they learn things. Finally, students reflect in their journals about something they hope to learn and what steps they will need to take to reach their goal.

CASEL Competencies

Self-awareness: The ability to accurately recognize one’s own emotions, thoughts, and values and how they influence behavior. The ability to accurately assess one’s strengths and limitations, with a well-grounded sense of confidence, optimism, and a "growth mindset."

Self-management: The ability to successfully regulate one’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in different situations — effectively managing stress, controlling impulses, and motivating oneself. The ability to set and work toward personal and academic goals.

Decision-making: The ability to make constructive choices about personal behavior and social interactions based on ethical standards, safety concerns, and social norms. The realistic evaluation of consequences of various actions, and a consideration of the well-being of oneself and others.

Classroom Teaching Example